High School Student Receives Scholarship for Post-Secondary Use
Posted on: June 16, 2017, by : Alicia Cordes-Mayo
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Black and white photo of teenager wearing a white denim jacket with a black head scarf. Shown from waist up.Meet Hawa Abbajebel, a CommonBond resident and recipient of the top CommonBond Leadership Scholarship. Hawa was one of five CommonBond youth who recently received a scholarship to use for post-secondary education.

Hawa has lived in a CommonBond housing community her entire life – first at Skyline Tower in St. Paul, and then at Torre de San Miguel on St. Paul’s Westside. She just finished her junior year of high school and is excited to continue looking at colleges over the summer.

We sat down with Hawa recently to ask her more about the scholarship and her volunteer service. Her thoughtful answers quickly showed us why she’s such a deserving scholarship recipient and bright light in the community.

 

CommonBond: Which CommonBond youth programs have you participated in?

Hawa: I did Study Buddies when I was younger, and then Learning Circles. Next year I’m hoping to work with the younger kids at Torre de San Miguel.

CommonBond: How have these programs impacted your school work and what you want to do in life?

Hawa: It was really cool because the Study Buddies mentors were always really interesting people from a variety of different fields. They helped you not only do well with your homework, but also with accessing different learning opportunities in the community. The youth programs helped you to make new friends – it’s really nice to become friends with your neighbors. My younger siblings come to the Advantage Center for homework help – that’s where they’ve met most of their neighborhood friends.

CommonBond: What kind of volunteer work do you do in the community?

Hawa: In my scholarship essay, instead of listing my specific volunteer roles and hours, I wrote about how volunteering in general has played a significant role in my life. To me, it doesn’t mean just going to a certain place without getting paid and then counting the hours you were there – in every aspect of your life, wherever you are, when you have an opportunity to help someone, that’s volunteering. I admire that my parents are very giving people, so that’s what I wrote about.

I also wrote about wanting to be able to give back to this community. St. Paul is a beautiful city – all of it, including the places with a lot of poverty. There’s even beauty in the brokenness of a neighborhood, including the parts that are forgotten. I often hear other kids say they want to get rich and move out of the neighborhood they grew up in – but if you stay, and try to do better and make it a better place, that’s the kind of America that we should aspire to. As the neighborhood residents, we know what’s going to work best – the people who grew up in affordable housing communities need to become mayors and CEOs and other kinds of leaders. We have the knowledge, experience, and ideas to make communities a place where everyone can do well.

CommonBond: What do you hope to do after you graduate from high school a year from now?

Hawa: I think about colleges a lot. I’ve looked at a number of them, and will look at more this summer. Wherever I end up, I hope to stay in Minnesota because it’s home. There are so many subjects and areas I’m interested in – it’s hard to choose. I know whatever I study and whichever field I go into in the future, it will be tied to helping communities.

CommonBond: What’s your favorite thing to do when you’re not studying or volunteering?

Hawa: My favorite activity is writing – especially short stories based on my own life experiences or my family’s experiences. I’d love to write a book about my family’s stories. I also like art, mostly painting and drawing. And I love skateboarding – I mostly just stay around my neighborhood because I like it here!